Veggie Rice

Riced veggies, fennel mint slaw, mahi with pear shallot and mint salsa and some hamama greens.
Ricing veggies is a great way to use up veggie scraps and to add plant variety.

Lately I have been focusing on plant fiber diversity which aids in increasing the diversity of the microbiome. Some bugs like some kinds of fibers while others prefer other types, so to keep them all happy you need to include lots of variety in your diet. One great way to diversify is to make veggie rice combos. There are lots of veggies that rice well. You can rice and freeze them in individual bags or as blends. It is also a great way to use up ends of things or veggies that are nearing the end of their prime. It’s also a great way to use things up before you go on vacation. So many wins here.

Things that rice well:
Cauliflower
Broccoli
Celeriac
Parsnip
Turnip
Sunchoke
Cabbage, but see notes
Beets
Sweet potato and squash
Carrot

Everyone is familiar with cauli rice. I usually don’t bother ricing that myself as it it inexpensive to buy organic frozen cauli rice at Whole Foods, so that is what I usually use.

Broccoli rice is another yummy option. I tend to rice the stems that get leftover from the flowerettes we roast. You can rice the stems as you go and add to a bag in the freezer or mix in to blend bags.

Celeriac is probably my new favorite all around veggie. What it lacks in beauty it makes up for in versatility. I thought it would be too much of a celery flavor, but it is actually quite mild. To rice it first thoroughly scrub and then just peel off the knobby and hairy parts. Cube it and pulse it in a food processor with the S blade. I like to saute or bake it. If you add poultry seasoning it tastes a lot like stuffing, so it can be a nice side for an AIP Thanksgiving dinner.

Parsnips and rice really well and are delicious alone or add nice mild sweetness to any blend. Carrots can be added to mixes for a little color.

Turnip rices well. I don’t love it all by itself flavor wise, but I add it to my blends and it mixes well.

Sunchokes are also something I don’t do solo, but I add to blends, though I know some people roast them for a nightshade free potato sub. I have heard they air fry well too.

I have riced cabbage. Green or red cabbage rice well, but are more watery than the options above. I add it in small quantities to blends. If you freeze it solo it will freeze into a solid mass, rather than like rice grains.

I am not a beet fan personally….tastes like dirt to me…just sayin, but I do hear you can rice it.

Sweet potato or squash also rice really well. I a little sweet potato to some of my blends. I tend to avoid it in larger quantities as it is very high in oxalate, but I add it in small quantities for color and flavor.

Rutabega rices well.

Spread your riced veggies thin on a parchment lined baking sheet and freeze. Then transfer to a bag. This reduces clumping. If things DO clump, just give them a good whack with a meat mallet and they will break up or they will also fall apart as they cook if added as chunks.

If you make these riced veggies and post to instagram, tag me @paleogirl99 I would love to see what combos you come up with!

Pea Free “Split Pea” Soup

Pea Free “Split Pea” Soup

I avoided legumes for a long time while working on reducing systemic inflammation. Thankfully now I am discovering I can tolerate some of them if they are pressure cooked. Boom. I wasn’t looking to recreate split pea soup, but I was whipping up a batch of my creamy veggie soup and it just happened to taste an awful lot like split pea. Had to write it down right after prepping so I can recreate it in the future. It is definitely a recipe I will make again! It is full of Continue reading

Paleo and Keto Frozen Travel Meals

Traveling is always challenging for me as it relates to food given my many limitations, Paleo, AIP, low histamine, low oxalate and lectin and lately back to keto low carb. The histamine issue creates the biggest obstacle for travel foods as leftovers or foods prepped ahead by restaurants are a big no no. Add to it that we are in the midst of a global pandemic and I decided to avoid eating out altogether. My plan you ask? Continue reading

Tigernut Low Carb Cookies

Tigernut Low Carb Cookies

Warning: These low carb cookies are dangerously good.
OK. You have been forewarned! Seriously though, over the last 7 years I rarely ate treats of any kind, but I am moving in to a phase of my diet with more inclusion, rather than exclusion and so I decided to create a low carb cookie I could enjoy as an occasional treat. These exceeded my expectations. I will say they are definitely Continue reading

Coconut Za’atar Turkey

Zesty za’atar and creamy coconut make a yummy combo!

I have just been introduced to the spice Sumac and I am a bit obsessed with it at the moment. My low histamine, AIP diet for the most part lacks the flavor profile “acid”…no vinegar (high histamine) and citrus is often iffy. So finding a spice that has a zingy acidic citrus note is a real Continue reading

Rainy Day Stew

A warming stew on a rainy day!

It rained off and on all day here in Miami and I felt a little bit of a chill. That had me craving a warming stew, so I pulled out my Instant Pot to get one going. It turned out super yummy, so I decided to share it here, so you (and I) can recreate it in the future. It hits all of my ‘___-frees”, gluten free, grain free, dairy free and it is low-ish carb to boot. Because it is pressure cooked it is even lower histamine than a traditional slow cooked stew. Boom.

Here is what I did. Continue reading

Upcycling your Hamama Coco Mats

What can I do with my used Hamama seed quilts you ask? ANYTHING but the garbage can is my reply!! There are lots of ways to repurpose or upcycle your mats.
First, peel off the seed layer and scrub or snip the roots off.
Give the mat a good washing with a natural gentle dish soap.
Then let the fun begin!

IN THE KITCHEN:
Cut them into thirds and use as scrubbers. These days many of the natural sponges have a coco fiber layer JUST like your mats.

IN THE BATHROOM:.
You can use a piece as a soap holder in your shower or bathtub.


IN THE GARDEN:

Cube them and use as a mulch in your garden bed or containers. Coco fiber has excellent water retention properties. You can add more as you use your mats over time. It will break down and add organic matter to your soil. WIN WIN!

Cut them into a circle and use to cover the drainage hole in the bottom of your garden pots or seed starter trays. This will allow drainage but keeps the soil inside. BOOM!

Tear them up and add to your orchid pots as a natural mulch.
(I actually put these in my blendtec and let them spin for a few seconds to unwind the mats, but not sure how that would work in a regular blender, it was just my time saving hack.)

At the very least you should compost your mats. I home compost mine and have found a few tricks that help. I peel off the seed layer since I don’t want a bunch of “volunteer” plants in my compost bin. Then I either peel the remaining coco mat into layers or cut it with heavy kitchen shears into strips or cubes. That way it composts more quickly. The more you break it down the more quickly it will decompose. It is considered a brown for those of you that compost.

Feeling crafty? Why not make some ornaments for an au natural Christmas tree this year! All you need is a sharpie, some sharp scissors, a few cookie cutters and some colorful cord to make a fun and crafty ornament. Use a skewer to poke a hole for the cord.

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